What It’s Like To Work On A Team Full of Women (And Why It’s Different From What You Think)

The other day, I took several of my employees to a networking event at a trendy co-working office in Santa Monica. When we walked in, the guys in the shared office spun around in their Aeron chairs, looked up from their Macbooks, and stared at us like they had just seen a ghost.

We don’t look like your typical tech company – we are all women. Yes, of our 30 employees, 28 are women. We are all women of different backgrounds, but when we’re at tech events, we always stand out.

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Three Day Rule is a matchmaking company that fuses traditional, in-person matchmaking with the technology of modern online dating. Even though matchmakers are often historically female, the modern dating industry is still dominated by men. Most CEOs of dating sites and apps are male, and although a few female-run sites, like Bumble and The League, have emerged, most employees are still men. At our company, women do just about everything.

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Watch “Bailout” web series directed by Iranian American Sara Zia Ebrahimi

With a unique perspective of the second generation children raised in American culture, Sara Zia Ebrahimi Does an incredible job of capturing the experience of a young woman trying to get her life together.

Bailout is set in 2009 and follows the story of Shalah or “Shay”, an Iranian American woman whose credit card debt presents a series of emotional and logistical challenges with her immigrant family. This is the 2nd episode of her web series which features the song “Azadi” by Mana, a Iranian American singer. For the whole series go to www.bailoutwebseries.com

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I told a dude how much I made. It changed my life

Imagine making 40% less than your male colleagues. They’re doing the same job as you, with the same or lesser qualifications.

For Saadia Muzaffar, that was a reality. It was also a catalyst for her to pursue change.

Muzaffar, a force in Canada’s tech scene who kicked off our 15 Questions series, said it was “crystallizing” when she found out that her male colleagues were making so much more than she was.

“It literally changed my life,” said Muzaffar, who was born and raised in Pakistan.

It drove her belief that pay transparency is essential to solving the pay gap.

Women earn about 78 cents to a man’s dollar, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. There’s a lot of nuance tucked inside that fact, but even when you drill down into individual professions, the gap persists. And it’s even more pronounced for black women (64 cents) and Latinas (56 cents).

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Lipstick Revolt: Women Empowerment Recap

ThankyouLR

It is safe to say that Lipstick Revolt: Women Empowerment 2015 was a total success. From start to finish the room was filled with love, unity, and creativity.

The panel & discussion segment of the nights was one of the most powerful discussions I have heard in a very long time where the panelists tackled taboo issues in concern with women. Every sentence held so much power and passion like when Molly Rulland made it clear that ”Until men hold other men accountable for their actions nothing will change.” As they opened questions to the audience, the gentlemen who were out in support made sure they were a part of the conversation and voiced their questions/thoughts.

Lipstick Revolt is excited about the future and is looking forward to planning the next Women Empowerment event.

Lipstick Revolt: Women Empowerment in Washington, DC March 8th, 2015

Lipstick Revolt

This event will feature some of the most talented ladies in the Washington DC area including:

Panel & Discussion:
Jane Pinczuk
Bushra Qureshi
- Dr. Thorne
Molly Ruland
Alicia Briançon
Performances (Music, Dance, Poetry)
Kayla Alexandra
Michele Michal Amira Pinczuk
Mana IsMe
LJ Johnson
Jay Mills
- Bushra Qureshi & Summra Khan
- & More
Painting
Kia Green
Paula Dea Creo Bannerman
- Michelle Chen
- Zsudayka Nzinga
Workshop
Networking
SPACYcLOUd
- & More!
Want to see a shot recap of the previous Lipstick Revolt event? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l12ie9hTpz8&feature=youtu.be

 

Mindy Kaling on Refusing to be an Outsider & Sexism

Mindy Kaling

Mindy Kaling is part of a small group of female comedians, writers and actresses who have created and now run their own TV shows. Kaling also stars in her show, The Mindy Project, as Mindy Lahiri, whom she describes as “delusionally confident” and “unapologetically selfish.”

And how do others describe Kaling? The word “pioneer” comes up a lot.

“I often forget that … being Indian, an Indian-American woman who is not, sort of, pencil thin — that that is very new to broadcast television,” Kaling tells NPR’s Rachel Martin.

Kaling and Martin discuss the challenges of being seen as a pioneer and the sexism Kaling has encountered on the job.


Interview Highlights

On her Mindy Project character

People, you know, had trouble with the character. She’s not immediately likeable. She does and says a lot of things that you don’t see in, forget female characters, any characters. Like, she says things like, “I’m going to hell because I don’t really care about the environment and I love to gossip.” She thinks Rick Santorum is handsome. Like, she has lots of all-over-the-map opinions and feelings that the writers dream up, but it makes her really original and fun. …

I don’t think anyone wants to grow up to be Mindy Lahiri, the same way no one wants to grow up to be Michael Scott [Steve Carell's character on The Office]. But that’s OK. … My dream of course, as a writer and a person who’s an entertainer, is: Grow up to be Mindy Kaling, don’t grow up to be Mindy Lahiri.

On being a role model

I embrace it. I think I’ve always wanted to be a role model, and I think … everyone should try to live their life like they’d like to be a role model. I think it’s like the thing keeping me out of jail. … It’s good for me mentally, selfishly, and it’s also nice to try to do that for, especially, younger women. I mean, it’s scary as hell. … I worry about it, but I think it’s a good thing to try to do.

Of course, everyone wants to be mythologized in a great way. I’d rather be like Odysseus than someone who was handed everything. And I, besides my parents and a handful of people, I don’t know anyone that worked harder. … I work so hard and so many hours, and I’ve done that for years and years and years. You know, I write a little bit about what it’s like to be a female boss in my book and the things I’ve noticed about that, but by and large, it’s just a tough job in general.

On the sexism she’s encountered on the job

Years from now, when I have time to sit and reflect on the different situations that I face every day, I’ll be able to speak more succinctly about the challenges as a woman. Yeah, there’s obviously instances where I perceive sexism in my job. … I think that the sort of sexism that I see has been one that’s a little bit like a gentler form of sexism, but still a little bit debilitating, which is that when, as a producer and a writer, whether it was at The Office or [at The Mindy Project], if I make a decision, it’ll still seem like it’s up for debate. And I notice that a little bit atThe Office, with, like, an actor: If I decided there’d be a certain way in the script, it would still seem open-ended, whereas … if I was a man I would not have seen that. [At The Mindy Project,] I feel that … less and less as I’ve sort of matured into the role more. The one thing I sort of, because of that, have felt [is] that when I made a decision I sort of would have to leave the room so that it was final and there was like no discussion would come after that.

On being referred to as a pioneer

I know why people are interested and I know why people want me to speak about it. But I sort of refuse to be an outsider, even though I know that I very much look like one to a lot of people, and I refuse to view myself in such terms.

On the challenge of talking about her otherness while also doing her job

I was on Twitter recently and a critic, who’s been very critical of me and of the show, was talking about a round table that three South Asian women had done where they kind of criticized and dissected the show, and said, “Why doesn’t Mindy respond to this?” …

I’m an actor and a writer and a showrunner and I edit my show. … I have a job that three people usually have, and I have it in one person. And the idea that the critic thought that I had this excess of time for which I could go to, like, panels or write essays was just so laughable to me.

And I think as women, you know, if you are considered a pioneer in these things, you can get really distracted by these other things — you know, people’s demands of you reflecting on your otherness. And for this white critic to say, “I don’t understand why she doesn’t do that” — and you’re like, “It’s because I’m running a show on a major network and I want the show to continue” — and to sort of guilt me. … I’m an A student. I’m addicted to feedback, and I want to please people. That’s sort of how I’ve gotten to where I am. And I think that it’s insidious to be spending more of your time reflecting and talking about panels, and talking more and more in smart ways about your otherness, rather than doing the hard work of your job.

Source: NPR.org

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We Mean Rise: Women Ahead For A Better Future

#Wemeanrise derived from the word womenrise (expansion of women) is a relay that was born November 10, 2014, following the meeting on the role of women in conflict resolution, held November 5, 2014 by the Elders , a independent coalition of influential world leaders who have decided to combine their efforts and experience to build a more harmonious, more just and more peaceful

The debate had gathered activists and peace activists in the Carter Center in Atlanta, Georgia, and online to discuss the effective contribution of women in conflict resolution. The assumption had been postulated as follows:

It is unthinkable to have a lasting peace without the full participation of women

This is about how to better expand the work of women in peace building in the world to answer this question, Mary Robinson has URGES those involved to establish contact between women and the competent authorities and associate their actions at all levels of the peace process Jimmy Carter , for his part, has stated that a good woman, eloquent and sincere, alone can influence an entire audience

Somali activist Asha Haji Elmi has highlighted the central role played by peace activists in risky way of representing the voice of the silent majority, mostly women and children, “with all the dangers that entails.

The fact that she concluded saying “I am ready to die for peace has left the room” Stunned “.

At Asha, I answer as follows:

We need you, your family and your loved ones need you, so do not die for peace, live peace! Do not take as many risks, life is precious and full of learning. Bring your experience on the table!

wemeanrise-we-mean-rise-twitter-list-member-trademark-art-designs

We Mean Rise aims to highlight the leadership, expertise, vision and action of women around the world. To this end I invite all women activists and non-profit organizations to join the relay to combine all our experiences and voices for a better future in the world. We are still at the beginning. I have created two lists: oneWomeanrise one that brings together women activists around the world and Wemeanrise 2where organizations working for the promotion of women find themselves. You or your organization can be included by simply sending me a tweet by subscribing to one or the other list
You can suportez us or write us on fa@trademarkart.org

It was a rich debate ideas involving Mary Robinson, Hina Jilani, Kofi Annan, Jimmy Carter, Manal Omar, Sanam Naraghi Anderlini including You Can watch the debate video here

Source: trademark.org

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SHE Interviews Rah Digga – Her beginning & future in Hip Hop

Rah Digga

Rah Digga is an inspiring woman to say the least. I was truly honored to speak with her and to hear first-hand what her journey in Hip Hop has been like. Most of the time we hear the ‘now’, not understanding the path that has led people to where they are today. I was excited, and little nervous talking to a legend, so I figured we would get right into the interview.

What some people don’t know is Rah Digga came into the music industry through Q-Tip. I asked how she got this opportunity, and how long had she been rapping prior to that encounter. She explained that Q-Tip was remixing the Outsiders single and she happened to be in the studio. At the time, Digga was pregnant, but was still grinding and trying to land a record deal before her due date. She rapped for Q-Tip, and as they say ‘the rest was history’; he immediately signed her. Amazed at her motivation, I asked Rah Digga if she was nervous talking to Q-Tip. She said since she knew her baby was coming any day, and she wasn’t going to stop until she got signed. There were no questions or other options.

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Potty-Mouthed Princesses use bad words for a good cause!

Sometimes, you have to try anything you can to get people’s attention. Why not get the future generation to help now?

Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism by FCKH8.com from FCKH8.com on Vimeo.

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Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai

Mural by: Anat Ronen

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