Category Archive: Business

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Uber Case Could Be a Watershed for Women in Tech

By Farhad Manjoo

Few women in Silicon Valley were surprised by the revelations about Uber detailed this month by Susan Fowler, a software engineer who published an exposé on the culture of sexism and sexual harassment that she said she battled during her year at the ride-hailing company.

For many women in Silicon Valley, the contours of Ms. Fowler’s story rang true from sorry experience. There are tales like hers from across the tech industry. This week, The Guardian reported that a female Tesla employee had filed suit against the electric-car company for what she called “pervasive harassment.” (Tesla said in a statement that the claims “have not been substantiated.”) And even in cases where abuse is well documented — as in Ellen Pao’s unsuccessful sexual harassment lawsuit against the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers — the men responsible are rarely punished, and the overall picture rarely improves.

Still, the Uber scandal feels different. It feels like a watershed. For gender-diversity advocates in the tech industry, Ms. Fowler’s allegations, and the public outcry they have ignited, offer a possibility that something new may be in the offing.

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Peace, Positivity as Massive Women’s March Makes Voices Heard in D.C.

by PHIL MCCAUSLAND

Hundreds of thousands of men and women descended into the nation’s capital, meeting in the national mall on Saturday, to show their support for women’s rights a day after President Donald Trump was inaugurated. Some voiced their opposition to the new president. An estimated 500,000 people attended the massive march, D.C.’s deputy mayor for public safety and justice said, citing the event’s organizers.

Those who participated in the Women’s March on Washington said the event was much more peaceful and positive than the protests during Friday’s inauguration.

D.C. police said they had no reports of arrests as of 6 p.m. on Saturday, a stark contrast to Friday’s anti-Trump protest that saw 230 people arrested, the windows of businesses smashed and a limo torched. Witnesses said self-described anarchists were behind some of Friday’s violence.

“This is not about people doing stupid stuff and getting arrested,” said Robin Gilmore, a 56-year-old therapist who drove up from Annapolis, Maryland, on Friday. “Really, the police are cooperating. This couldn’t happen without police cooperation.”

Marchers reported that police were civil and participants were kind to one another, often looking after each other in the dense crowd. People were elbow-to-elbow and some said they couldn’t move for hours.

Steve La Croix traveled from Seattle to Michigan, where he met members of his family. They rented and drove a bus overnight to the Women’s March. He said that the atmosphere was collegial and participants were considerate.

“People were very polite,” La Croix said. “There was a lot of ‘Go ahead’ or ‘You first.’”

One criticism of the march has been that it seemed to have scattered ideas and took up too many issues, but those who were at the Women’s March said that is part of building a coalition.

Dana Gwinn, 36, traveled to the march from the Bay Area and said, though there were numerous ideas, she believed it important to discuss all of them.

“There were a lot of messages,” Gwinn said. “I felt today like I felt on election night. I want to be mad about 15 different things, and everyone says you need to choose what your battle is going to be and stick to that one thing.

“But I don’t know anyone willing to choose.”
Kristen Kramer, 29, a D.C. resident who lives close to where a limo was set on fire by protesters on Friday, said the march was very polite compared to the inauguration, which she described as a “surreal” environment. But Kramer didn’t think the civility was necessarily a good thing.

“It is really polite, and it kind of pisses me off to be honest,” she said. “Considering how the police yesterday became incredibly aggressive, it feels like this today is lip service to protest.”

She described protests on Friday as largely peaceful assemblies that suffered from a few violent individuals. Kramer thought the police treated protesters at the inauguration poorly and saw demonstrators suffering severely from pepper spray.

“I hope people don’t just forget yesterday,” she said. “I don’t know what will come of it legally, but for it just to disappear is not okay.”

The marches were not confined to Washington. An estimated 400,000 people marched in New York City, 250,000 marched in Chicago, over 100,000 marched in Los Angeles, more than 90,000 ink St. Paul, Minnesota, and 60,000 turned out in Atlanta among other cities around the world, authorities and organizers said.

Source: Nbc

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LA Film Festival Unveils 2016 Lineup with 43% Women Directors

The LA Film Festival has revealed the lineup for its 2016 edition. Women directors are very well represented in the 22nd annual fest— take note, Cannes.

“Paint it Black”: LA Film Festival

The lineup features a slate of 56 feature films, 58 short films, and 13 short episodic works representing 28 countries and will feature 42 world premieres. Across the five feature competition categories, 43 percent of the films are directed by women, a three percent increase from last year’s already stellar 40 percent.

Actress Amber Tamblyn (“Two and a Half Men”) will be making her directorial debut with “Paint it Black,” which follows a young woman coping with the tragic death of her boyfriend. Ava DuVernay, director of “Selma,” and her distribution company Array Releasing will receive the Spirit of Independence Award.

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Zaha Hadid: 5 Traits that Made her So Badass

Zaha Hadid: 5 Traits that Made her So Badass

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Dame Zaha Hadid, the Baghdad-born British designer has sadly passed away at the premature age of 65. The first female Pritzker Prize-winner architect was commissioned around the world to create masterpieces including the London Olympic aquatic centre, and Messner Mountain Museum Corones. Being a woman and Muslim she didn’t have it easy but it was her strength and lack of fucks to give that made her a true legend. We remember Hadid’s five traits that turned her into a star architect for all the right reasons.

IMAGINATIVE
In early projects the designer presented her ideas to clients through beautiful abstract paintings, this gained her notoriety, however, it left her with a reputation for astonishing but unbuildable designs. Her creative process lead people to closely associate her skills with that of a fashion designer. “I’m into fashion because it contains the mood of the day, of the moment – like music, literature, and art,” she once said. Hadid frequently collaborated with Karl Lagerfeld which amounted in the Mobile Art Pavilion designed for Chanel, launched in 2011 in Paris.

‘I’M INTO FASHION BECAUSE IT CONTAINS THE MOOD OF THE DAY, OF THE MOMENT – LIKE MUSIC, LITERATURE, AND ART’

INSPIRATIONAL
Hadid adapted technology to realise the buildings she did by hand. Her avant garde work and use of innovative technologies developed into a style of its own. Deservingly, Hadid was the first woman to win the Pritzker Prize as well the first woman to be honoured the British RIBA Gold Medal, in 2016. In part of her acceptance speech she commented on the struggles women experience in the business world specifically within architecture: “We now see more established female architects all the time. That doesn’t mean it’s easy. Sometimes the challenges are immense.”

NOBILITY
“Education, housing and hospitals are the most important things for society,” Hadid said. She believed in having a back bone for society to build upon, a reputable quality she was widely admired for. Hadid strived to change our perceptions of space, not only in physically but socially and culturally as well.

‘EDUCATION, HOUSING AND HOSPITALS ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS FOR SOCIETY’

‘I’M A FEMINIST, BECAUSE I SEE ALL WOMEN AS SMART, GIFTED AND TOUGH’

RESILIENT
“People don’t talk to you properly. It’s the way they talk to you; they dismiss you,” Hadid said. “I think it’s a combination of me being a woman and a foreigner.” Although she faced discrimination for being a woman, a Muslim, and an Arab, Zaha never ceased to keep going strong. “Yes, I’m a feminist, because I see all women as smart, gifted and tough.”

OPTIMIST
“You have to really believe not only in yourself; you have to believe that the world is actually worth your sacrifices.” Zaha Hadid was known for consistently pushing the boundaries in her personal life, humanity and designs. “There are 360 degrees, so why stick to one?” she famously asked.

Source: Sleek Mag

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New Anthology Celebrates The Foremothers Of The Women’s Spirituality Movement

The book aims to “inspire the next generation of women,” says editor Miriam Robbins Dexter.

Headshot of Antonia Blumberg
Antonia Blumberg Associate Religion Editor, The Huffington Post
Posted: 11/10/2015 07:31 AM EST

From meditation circles to sacred retreats, women today have endless opportunities to congregate with one another and develop their spiritual lives.

This was not always the case.

In 1970s America, a generation of women raised primarily on male-dominated religious traditions began waking up to a different kind of spirituality centered on the divine feminine, or Goddess. They helped formulate a burgeoning theology – or thealogy, as some write — of women’s spirituality. Their efforts are celebrated in the new anthology Foremothers of the Women’s Spirituality Movement: Elders and Visionaries, which was released Monday and features essays from dozens of pioneers of the field.

COURTESY OF CAMBRIA PRESS

“One of my goals with this book is to inspire the next generation of women who are active in women’s spirituality to bring that vision of the divine into the world,” said Miriam Robbins Dexter, a research scholar at UCLA who co-edited the anthology with author and scholar Vicki Noble.

At the time Dexter began studying Indo-European goddesses in college in the ’70s, she thought the interest in women’s spirituality might be “a passing fad.” But that didn’t particularly matter to her.

“What I did know was that I was on my life path,” she said.

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White House to Host Summit Focusing on Women and Girls of Color

By: Maya Rhodan @m_rhodan 3:46 PM ET

After taking heat for not addressing issues affecting women and girls of color, the White House will host a summit Friday on expanding opportunity for them.

Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett and the White House Council on Women and Girls will host women who are experts on a range of subjects such as violence, workers rights, hip hop and health as it releases an update to the 2014 report “Women and Girls of Color: Addressing Challenges and Expanding Opportunities.”

Senior Advisor to the President of the United States Valerie Jarrett onstage at Grounded in History, Soaring into the Future: Rev. Joseph E. Lowery’s 94th Birthday Celebration at Delta flight Museum on October 6, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia.

The summit will focus on a range of issues including economic development, healthcare, criminal justice, vulnerability to violence, hip-hop, and images of women in media. Participants include Attorney General Loretta Lynch, Tina Tchen of the White House Council on Women and Girls, Cecilia Muñoz of the White House Domestic Policy Council, MSNBC host Melissa Harris-Perry and Teresa Younger of the Ms. Foundation.

The Administration has found itself in an interesting position in President Obama’s second term. Though Obama was praised for taking steps to address problems facing boys and young men of color through his My Brother’s Keeper Program, the gendered focus made many girls and women’s advocates wondering about their issues.

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What It’s Like To Work On A Team Full of Women (And Why It’s Different From What You Think)

The other day, I took several of my employees to a networking event at a trendy co-working office in Santa Monica. When we walked in, the guys in the shared office spun around in their Aeron chairs, looked up from their Macbooks, and stared at us like they had just seen a ghost.

We don’t look like your typical tech company – we are all women. Yes, of our 30 employees, 28 are women. We are all women of different backgrounds, but when we’re at tech events, we always stand out.

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Three Day Rule is a matchmaking company that fuses traditional, in-person matchmaking with the technology of modern online dating. Even though matchmakers are often historically female, the modern dating industry is still dominated by men. Most CEOs of dating sites and apps are male, and although a few female-run sites, like Bumble and The League, have emerged, most employees are still men. At our company, women do just about everything.

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I told a dude how much I made. It changed my life

Imagine making 40% less than your male colleagues. They’re doing the same job as you, with the same or lesser qualifications.

For Saadia Muzaffar, that was a reality. It was also a catalyst for her to pursue change.

Muzaffar, a force in Canada’s tech scene who kicked off our 15 Questions series, said it was “crystallizing” when she found out that her male colleagues were making so much more than she was.

“It literally changed my life,” said Muzaffar, who was born and raised in Pakistan.

It drove her belief that pay transparency is essential to solving the pay gap.

Women earn about 78 cents to a man’s dollar, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. There’s a lot of nuance tucked inside that fact, but even when you drill down into individual professions, the gap persists. And it’s even more pronounced for black women (64 cents) and Latinas (56 cents).

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MC Lyte Talks About the Lack of Female Rappers in Mainstream

The female voice in Hip Hop has played an important role in the continued success of the culture since its early days.

Groundbreaking artists like Roxanne Shanté, Sha-Rock, Sister Souljah, Queen Latifah, and MC Lyte paved the way for the following generation of femcees like Lauryn Hill, Missy Elliott, Lil Kim, Foxy Brown, Eve, and then eventually Nicki Minaj, Iggy Azalea, Azealia Banks, and Angel Haze. 

While women in Hip Hop have produced chart topping singles and classic albums over the last three decades, major labels are still not signing the lyrical ladies at the same rate as their male counterparts.

Evidence of this difference is the fact that in 2010 only 3 female rappers were signed to a major label record deal; at one point there were 40. Subsequently, there was not one solo album by a female rapper that broke into the top 10 on the Billboard 200 album chart in 2013.

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10 Women Who Shaped the Future

(CNN) – The women of the year helped bring the economy back from the brink, worked against tyranny, and championed equality, education and justice. Most of all, they helped open our eyes to how much remains to be done.

Malala Yousafzai

If 2012 was the year most of us first heard about the 14-year-old Pakistani girl, it was 2013 when we learned nobody could silence her, especially not the cowardly Taliban men who tried to kill her.

Malala had become a vocal advocate of the right of all girls to an education, a frightening prospect for the Taliban. In October 2012, machine-gun toting extremists walked onto a school van, asked for Malala, then shot her in the face.

Instead of intimidating her, the Taliban turned her into their own worst nightmare — a powerful girl more admired and articulate than ever.

This year we found that Malala’s impact is just beginning. As a leading candidate for the Nobel Peace Prize, her advocacy for girls inspires hope around the world. And she’s just getting started.

Nadezhda Tolokonnikova of Pussy Riot

What is it about macho politicians who get so scared of brave women?

In Russia, President Vladimir Putin’s suppression of the political opposition spurred an unlikely force, the defiantly named punk rock group Pussy Riot. The female band protested Putin’s increasing authoritarianism. When five of them broke out into an anti-Putin song, “Punk Prayer,” at Moscow’s main Orthodox cathedral, two of them — Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina — were arrested and put in prison.

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