Tag Archives: Women

Uber Case Could Be a Watershed for Women in Tech

By Farhad Manjoo

Few women in Silicon Valley were surprised by the revelations about Uber detailed this month by Susan Fowler, a software engineer who published an exposé on the culture of sexism and sexual harassment that she said she battled during her year at the ride-hailing company.

For many women in Silicon Valley, the contours of Ms. Fowler’s story rang true from sorry experience. There are tales like hers from across the tech industry. This week, The Guardian reported that a female Tesla employee had filed suit against the electric-car company for what she called “pervasive harassment.” (Tesla said in a statement that the claims “have not been substantiated.”) And even in cases where abuse is well documented — as in Ellen Pao’s unsuccessful sexual harassment lawsuit against the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers — the men responsible are rarely punished, and the overall picture rarely improves.

Still, the Uber scandal feels different. It feels like a watershed. For gender-diversity advocates in the tech industry, Ms. Fowler’s allegations, and the public outcry they have ignited, offer a possibility that something new may be in the offing.

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Peace, Positivity as Massive Women’s March Makes Voices Heard in D.C.

by PHIL MCCAUSLAND

Hundreds of thousands of men and women descended into the nation’s capital, meeting in the national mall on Saturday, to show their support for women’s rights a day after President Donald Trump was inaugurated. Some voiced their opposition to the new president. An estimated 500,000 people attended the massive march, D.C.’s deputy mayor for public safety and justice said, citing the event’s organizers.

Those who participated in the Women’s March on Washington said the event was much more peaceful and positive than the protests during Friday’s inauguration.

D.C. police said they had no reports of arrests as of 6 p.m. on Saturday, a stark contrast to Friday’s anti-Trump protest that saw 230 people arrested, the windows of businesses smashed and a limo torched. Witnesses said self-described anarchists were behind some of Friday’s violence.

“This is not about people doing stupid stuff and getting arrested,” said Robin Gilmore, a 56-year-old therapist who drove up from Annapolis, Maryland, on Friday. “Really, the police are cooperating. This couldn’t happen without police cooperation.”

Marchers reported that police were civil and participants were kind to one another, often looking after each other in the dense crowd. People were elbow-to-elbow and some said they couldn’t move for hours.

Steve La Croix traveled from Seattle to Michigan, where he met members of his family. They rented and drove a bus overnight to the Women’s March. He said that the atmosphere was collegial and participants were considerate.

“People were very polite,” La Croix said. “There was a lot of ‘Go ahead’ or ‘You first.’”

One criticism of the march has been that it seemed to have scattered ideas and took up too many issues, but those who were at the Women’s March said that is part of building a coalition.

Dana Gwinn, 36, traveled to the march from the Bay Area and said, though there were numerous ideas, she believed it important to discuss all of them.

“There were a lot of messages,” Gwinn said. “I felt today like I felt on election night. I want to be mad about 15 different things, and everyone says you need to choose what your battle is going to be and stick to that one thing.

“But I don’t know anyone willing to choose.”
Kristen Kramer, 29, a D.C. resident who lives close to where a limo was set on fire by protesters on Friday, said the march was very polite compared to the inauguration, which she described as a “surreal” environment. But Kramer didn’t think the civility was necessarily a good thing.

“It is really polite, and it kind of pisses me off to be honest,” she said. “Considering how the police yesterday became incredibly aggressive, it feels like this today is lip service to protest.”

She described protests on Friday as largely peaceful assemblies that suffered from a few violent individuals. Kramer thought the police treated protesters at the inauguration poorly and saw demonstrators suffering severely from pepper spray.

“I hope people don’t just forget yesterday,” she said. “I don’t know what will come of it legally, but for it just to disappear is not okay.”

The marches were not confined to Washington. An estimated 400,000 people marched in New York City, 250,000 marched in Chicago, over 100,000 marched in Los Angeles, more than 90,000 ink St. Paul, Minnesota, and 60,000 turned out in Atlanta among other cities around the world, authorities and organizers said.

Source: Nbc

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Poetry by Chin-Yer

They always try to give me a penis
simply because I have guts
Simply because I am bold
And achieve
“That takes balls!” they say
No
it takes titties
And a vagina
It takes operating from a place
Higher than both, if you want to be technical but
My femininity is complimentary enough
When you do anything of substance, sir
I don’t tell you
“That took estrogen”
Even though I know the power of woman.

By Chin-Yer

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Erykah Badu Donating Concert Proceeds to Clear Detroit Rape-Kit Backlog


Erykah Badu is donating the proceeds from her upcoming Detroit concert to a nonprofit that tests the city’s backlog of rape kits, the Detroit Free Press reports. Five dollars from each ticket sold for Badu’s August 12 performance at the Chene Park Amphitheater will go to the African-American 490 Challenge, which raises money to test the 11,000 abandoned rape kits found in a Detroit police warehouse in 2009. (Each test costs $490.) Badu will also donate the proceeds from the concert’s $100 “pre-show reception” and $1,000 “VIP reception” to the campaign, in what Wayne County prosecutor Kym Worthy calls a “phenomenal assist” to the cause. There are tens of thousands of untested rape kits across the United States.

Source: Vulture

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The Atlas of Beauty- showing beautiful women from around the world

Women from PeruIn contrast to the constant barrage of women’s fashion magazines declaring what is attractive, photographer Mihaela Noroc set off on a journey around the world.
The Romanian traveled to 37 different countries, where she often met women simply walking the street and took their portraits, highlighting what is considered desirable in different cultures.
From the freezing, chaffing Tibetan Plateau near the Himalayas to the sultry tropics of South America, Noroc, 29, entitled her startling and revealing project, ‘The Atlas of Beauty.’Photographer Mihaela Noroc
At times spending only 30 seconds with each subject and traveling only with her camera and a backpack, Noroc tried to take pictures of young women all in their twenties.
She explained in a statement to Daily Mail Online ‘I’m a [29-year-old] female photographer from Romania that quit her boring job and started a new life. Two years ago I took my backpack, my camera and begun to travel around the globe, with savings made in years of working.
‘In this journey I photographed hundreds of natural women surrounded by their culture. My project is called ‘The Atlas Of Beauty’ and is about our planet’s diversity shown through portraits of women.’

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New Anthology Celebrates The Foremothers Of The Women’s Spirituality Movement

The book aims to “inspire the next generation of women,” says editor Miriam Robbins Dexter.

Headshot of Antonia Blumberg
Antonia Blumberg Associate Religion Editor, The Huffington Post
Posted: 11/10/2015 07:31 AM EST

From meditation circles to sacred retreats, women today have endless opportunities to congregate with one another and develop their spiritual lives.

This was not always the case.

In 1970s America, a generation of women raised primarily on male-dominated religious traditions began waking up to a different kind of spirituality centered on the divine feminine, or Goddess. They helped formulate a burgeoning theology – or thealogy, as some write — of women’s spirituality. Their efforts are celebrated in the new anthology Foremothers of the Women’s Spirituality Movement: Elders and Visionaries, which was released Monday and features essays from dozens of pioneers of the field.

COURTESY OF CAMBRIA PRESS

“One of my goals with this book is to inspire the next generation of women who are active in women’s spirituality to bring that vision of the divine into the world,” said Miriam Robbins Dexter, a research scholar at UCLA who co-edited the anthology with author and scholar Vicki Noble.

At the time Dexter began studying Indo-European goddesses in college in the ’70s, she thought the interest in women’s spirituality might be “a passing fad.” But that didn’t particularly matter to her.

“What I did know was that I was on my life path,” she said.

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What It’s Like To Work On A Team Full of Women (And Why It’s Different From What You Think)

The other day, I took several of my employees to a networking event at a trendy co-working office in Santa Monica. When we walked in, the guys in the shared office spun around in their Aeron chairs, looked up from their Macbooks, and stared at us like they had just seen a ghost.

We don’t look like your typical tech company – we are all women. Yes, of our 30 employees, 28 are women. We are all women of different backgrounds, but when we’re at tech events, we always stand out.

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Three Day Rule is a matchmaking company that fuses traditional, in-person matchmaking with the technology of modern online dating. Even though matchmakers are often historically female, the modern dating industry is still dominated by men. Most CEOs of dating sites and apps are male, and although a few female-run sites, like Bumble and The League, have emerged, most employees are still men. At our company, women do just about everything.

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I told a dude how much I made. It changed my life

Imagine making 40% less than your male colleagues. They’re doing the same job as you, with the same or lesser qualifications.

For Saadia Muzaffar, that was a reality. It was also a catalyst for her to pursue change.

Muzaffar, a force in Canada’s tech scene who kicked off our 15 Questions series, said it was “crystallizing” when she found out that her male colleagues were making so much more than she was.

“It literally changed my life,” said Muzaffar, who was born and raised in Pakistan.

It drove her belief that pay transparency is essential to solving the pay gap.

Women earn about 78 cents to a man’s dollar, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. There’s a lot of nuance tucked inside that fact, but even when you drill down into individual professions, the gap persists. And it’s even more pronounced for black women (64 cents) and Latinas (56 cents).

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Mindy Kaling on Refusing to be an Outsider & Sexism

Mindy Kaling

Mindy Kaling is part of a small group of female comedians, writers and actresses who have created and now run their own TV shows. Kaling also stars in her show, The Mindy Project, as Mindy Lahiri, whom she describes as “delusionally confident” and “unapologetically selfish.”

And how do others describe Kaling? The word “pioneer” comes up a lot.

“I often forget that … being Indian, an Indian-American woman who is not, sort of, pencil thin — that that is very new to broadcast television,” Kaling tells NPR’s Rachel Martin.

Kaling and Martin discuss the challenges of being seen as a pioneer and the sexism Kaling has encountered on the job.


Interview Highlights

On her Mindy Project character

People, you know, had trouble with the character. She’s not immediately likeable. She does and says a lot of things that you don’t see in, forget female characters, any characters. Like, she says things like, “I’m going to hell because I don’t really care about the environment and I love to gossip.” She thinks Rick Santorum is handsome. Like, she has lots of all-over-the-map opinions and feelings that the writers dream up, but it makes her really original and fun. …

I don’t think anyone wants to grow up to be Mindy Lahiri, the same way no one wants to grow up to be Michael Scott [Steve Carell's character on The Office]. But that’s OK. … My dream of course, as a writer and a person who’s an entertainer, is: Grow up to be Mindy Kaling, don’t grow up to be Mindy Lahiri.

On being a role model

I embrace it. I think I’ve always wanted to be a role model, and I think … everyone should try to live their life like they’d like to be a role model. I think it’s like the thing keeping me out of jail. … It’s good for me mentally, selfishly, and it’s also nice to try to do that for, especially, younger women. I mean, it’s scary as hell. … I worry about it, but I think it’s a good thing to try to do.

Of course, everyone wants to be mythologized in a great way. I’d rather be like Odysseus than someone who was handed everything. And I, besides my parents and a handful of people, I don’t know anyone that worked harder. … I work so hard and so many hours, and I’ve done that for years and years and years. You know, I write a little bit about what it’s like to be a female boss in my book and the things I’ve noticed about that, but by and large, it’s just a tough job in general.

On the sexism she’s encountered on the job

Years from now, when I have time to sit and reflect on the different situations that I face every day, I’ll be able to speak more succinctly about the challenges as a woman. Yeah, there’s obviously instances where I perceive sexism in my job. … I think that the sort of sexism that I see has been one that’s a little bit like a gentler form of sexism, but still a little bit debilitating, which is that when, as a producer and a writer, whether it was at The Office or [at The Mindy Project], if I make a decision, it’ll still seem like it’s up for debate. And I notice that a little bit atThe Office, with, like, an actor: If I decided there’d be a certain way in the script, it would still seem open-ended, whereas … if I was a man I would not have seen that. [At The Mindy Project,] I feel that … less and less as I’ve sort of matured into the role more. The one thing I sort of, because of that, have felt [is] that when I made a decision I sort of would have to leave the room so that it was final and there was like no discussion would come after that.

On being referred to as a pioneer

I know why people are interested and I know why people want me to speak about it. But I sort of refuse to be an outsider, even though I know that I very much look like one to a lot of people, and I refuse to view myself in such terms.

On the challenge of talking about her otherness while also doing her job

I was on Twitter recently and a critic, who’s been very critical of me and of the show, was talking about a round table that three South Asian women had done where they kind of criticized and dissected the show, and said, “Why doesn’t Mindy respond to this?” …

I’m an actor and a writer and a showrunner and I edit my show. … I have a job that three people usually have, and I have it in one person. And the idea that the critic thought that I had this excess of time for which I could go to, like, panels or write essays was just so laughable to me.

And I think as women, you know, if you are considered a pioneer in these things, you can get really distracted by these other things — you know, people’s demands of you reflecting on your otherness. And for this white critic to say, “I don’t understand why she doesn’t do that” — and you’re like, “It’s because I’m running a show on a major network and I want the show to continue” — and to sort of guilt me. … I’m an A student. I’m addicted to feedback, and I want to please people. That’s sort of how I’ve gotten to where I am. And I think that it’s insidious to be spending more of your time reflecting and talking about panels, and talking more and more in smart ways about your otherness, rather than doing the hard work of your job.

Source: NPR.org

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We Mean Rise: Women Ahead For A Better Future

#Wemeanrise derived from the word womenrise (expansion of women) is a relay that was born November 10, 2014, following the meeting on the role of women in conflict resolution, held November 5, 2014 by the Elders , a independent coalition of influential world leaders who have decided to combine their efforts and experience to build a more harmonious, more just and more peaceful

The debate had gathered activists and peace activists in the Carter Center in Atlanta, Georgia, and online to discuss the effective contribution of women in conflict resolution. The assumption had been postulated as follows:

It is unthinkable to have a lasting peace without the full participation of women

This is about how to better expand the work of women in peace building in the world to answer this question, Mary Robinson has URGES those involved to establish contact between women and the competent authorities and associate their actions at all levels of the peace process Jimmy Carter , for his part, has stated that a good woman, eloquent and sincere, alone can influence an entire audience

Somali activist Asha Haji Elmi has highlighted the central role played by peace activists in risky way of representing the voice of the silent majority, mostly women and children, “with all the dangers that entails.

The fact that she concluded saying “I am ready to die for peace has left the room” Stunned “.

At Asha, I answer as follows:

We need you, your family and your loved ones need you, so do not die for peace, live peace! Do not take as many risks, life is precious and full of learning. Bring your experience on the table!

wemeanrise-we-mean-rise-twitter-list-member-trademark-art-designs

We Mean Rise aims to highlight the leadership, expertise, vision and action of women around the world. To this end I invite all women activists and non-profit organizations to join the relay to combine all our experiences and voices for a better future in the world. We are still at the beginning. I have created two lists: oneWomeanrise one that brings together women activists around the world and Wemeanrise 2where organizations working for the promotion of women find themselves. You or your organization can be included by simply sending me a tweet by subscribing to one or the other list
You can suportez us or write us on fa@trademarkart.org

It was a rich debate ideas involving Mary Robinson, Hina Jilani, Kofi Annan, Jimmy Carter, Manal Omar, Sanam Naraghi Anderlini including You Can watch the debate video here

Source: trademark.org

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